Teaching Theory

  1. The difference between normative and positivist categorisations used in Philosophy.
  2. Learning Theories conceptually summarised
  3. A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories from
  4. Learning Theories Conceptually Linked
  5. Learning Theories explained.
  6. What is Pedagogy? -a summary

[2] Below:  The Theory of Instruction - The most valid learning theory with the greatest amount of scientifically verified evidence in support of it.

[1] The difference between normative and positivist categorisations used in Philosophy.

“In philosophy, normative statements affirm how things should or ought to be, how to value them, which things are good or bad, and which actions are right or wrong.

Normative is usually contrasted with Positivist (i.e. descriptive, explanatory, or constative) claims when describing types of theories, beliefs, or propositions.

Positivist statements are factual statements that attempt to describe reality.

For example, "children should eat vegetables", and "those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither" are normative claims. On the other hand, "vegetables contain a relatively high proportion of vitamins", "smoking causes cancer", and "a common consequence of sacrificing liberty for security is a loss of both" are positive claims. Whether or not a statement is normative is logically independent of whether it is verified, verifiable, or popularly held”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normative





[3] Below: A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories from

http://edudemic.com/2012/12/a-simple-guide-to-4-complex-learning-theories/

Please use the internal scroll bars as this diagram is very long.


[5] Source: Learning Theories explained.

[4] Learning Theories Conceptually Linked
Source: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/a-great-wheel-of-all-learning-theories.html

[6] What is Pedagogy? - a summary

[7] Below: Learning Theories conceptually summarised